Day 5

This entry is part 6 of 9 in the series Iceland Adventure

Inevitably, when someone learned that I was going to Iceland they would ask, “Are you going to ride the horses?”  And I would emphatically say NO!!! Absolutely not! I want to see them and admire them from a distance, but I don’t need to ride a horse on my vacation.  And of course, I immersed myself in the biking and I didn’t think about a single pony….. until one was standing at the fence watching me pedal by. It was a slow motion collision of eyes. We locked gazes, and I jumped off Foxy spellbound, and cooed my way to the little boy.  He was about 4 years old, curious, sweet and playful. And of course, then I wanted to spend all day with him!  His name shall be Smokey, and he will be my friend forever!

Despite the 50 acres of grass in his field, Smokey fell for the age old "Greener on the other side of the fence" routine.
Despite the 50 acres of grass in his field, Smokey fell for the age old “Greener on the other side of the fence” routine.
I shall love him forever.
I shall love him forever.

 

From our awesome seaside camping spot, we rode out to investigate the two towns that were “bigish”. At least if you were to judge by the font size on the map, one could be led to believe that they were prosperous towns.  But not so. There was one functioning little gas/quick mart shop, and that was about it for food attractions. Where are all the pubs, ala Ireland and England?? Shouldn’t every little town have it’s meeting center where locals can talk and have some grub? I still don’t know the answer to why this is not so in Iceland, but perhaps it’s the brutally expensive food? Maybe they need a menu that is only for the locals, and 70% off from the tourist price.  If anyone can answer this, please inform me.

Early 1900's this was one of the largest fishing ports on the south of Iceland. Hard to imagine how it was worth it to navigate through all the lava in the bay.
Early 1900’s this was one of the largest fishing ports on the south of Iceland. Hard to imagine how it was worth it to navigate through all the lava in the bay.

Our camp was in Stokkseyri, a once booming fishing center. Throughout this day we would encounter large signs explaining the village’s past and the history of the region. It was incredibly informative and we loved those signs.  For instance… Did you know that if you sailed straight south from Stokkseyri, the first piece of land you would encounter is Antarctica? You would squeak between Cape Verde and Dakar and cruise on south until you hit a large, icy rock called Antarctica.  Small factoid that you will now never forget.img_9905

This was yet another day where we did not pack enough lunch. Oh, when will we learn?!  We battled a bit of a headwind all day long that meant echelon riding when possible. Sometimes, it was more like “Meika and Megan hiding behind their respective husbands”. Which is a little known biking strategy, but highly useful for Meika and Megan.  Tiring for Mark and Clint. But the headwind meant that we all were even more hungry than usual. We made it back to Kevin around late afternoon and quickly mixed up a pot of quick potato soup as an appetizer. We did manage to find a pub for dinner, but it was hard to find!

We took a risk that night and camped in what we felt was an dubiously legal zone.  There is no camping outside of designated sites…. But this seemed like a very designated gravel area that begged for a bright orange Kevin to sit on it. After we were settled in our sleeping bags and had relaxed for about 10 min, KNOCK KNOCK KNOCK. And an Icelandic officer informed us that we were breaking the law.  Clint was supremely polite and we packed out stuff and hit the road again.  Oddly enough, we found a fantastic place to camp not far from there. Also illegal, but hard to find.  And that is the difference between stupidity and genius.

I asked a roadside farm a zillion questions about his hay and horse husbandry. He said that they get about 5-7 cuttings of hay off their land!! Holy smoke that is fertile.
I asked a roadside farmer a zillion questions about his hay and horse husbandry. He said that they get about 5-7 cuttings of hay off their land!! Holy smoke that is fertile. Note: Santa works for him in the off season.
Shelter for fisherman from early 1800s. Dark, damp and dreary.
Shelter for fisherman from early 1800s. Dark, damp and dreary.
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